SuperHome Database

High Wycombe, Richard Gardens, Krofire House

House Summary

Owner(s):
Mark and Liya Brown
House Type:
1980's 5-bedroom detached, a flint brick design in a Conservation area
Carbon saving:
90%
Reported saving on bills:
90%
Total invested:
£40000

Measures installed:

  • Biomass Boiler
  • Cavity Wall Insulation
  • Double Glazing
  • Draught-proofing
  • Loft Insulation
  • Low Energy Appliances
  • Low Energy Lighting
  • Solar PV Panels
  • Solar Water Heating
  • Water Saving Devices

  • Mark Brown next to his SuperHome in High Wycombe
  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Upcoming events

Along with nationally organised events this SuperHome is also open to the public by appointment - please use the contact form below if no Open Days are showing.

What visitors are saying

"Wonderful and inspiring to see how others have tackled energy efficiency in their own homes"

“What a fabulous tour - extremely informative with greater detail than I expected. A lot of inspirational ideas with practical suggestions of how to implement them.”

“Inspiring range of energy efficiency and renewable generation some really simple stuff never seen before, and top level PV, solar hot water, biomass boiler - all great to see in action.”

"Wow! I've never seen a wood boiler before. It is amazing how productive it is!"

"Quite inspiring the range and variety of changes the owner had made to their home. I shall certainly think more creatively about what I can do myself."

Personal story:

This is not our first Superhome. We originally fitted photovoltaics to our first home in 2005 before moving to the current home in 2008. The new home was about 70% bigger than the previous home but we were determined it would actually use less gas, electricity and water. When not working on the SuperHome project I (Mark) work as a freelance IT Consultant whilst Liya is our homemaker with part-time career in Adult Education. We have two girls. Liya is the Gardener and Jewellery maker. Mark is DIYer and scale model maker. We both read books avidly. Nobody in our family think of themselves as environmentalists nor do we think we are saving the planet. We just believe the future may different from the past so we are planning ahead for our security. Just seems like commonsense.

Motivations:

Since 2001 I (Mark) had been concerned that our culture was addicted to oil and this would only lead to insecurity through war, climate change and depletion. It seemed like we should offer leadership and solutions rather than be part of the problem. For Liya and our children it all seemed like commonsense for us to wrap the house up warm and be energy independent. What we didn’t want to do was to turn the house into a wacky science-experiment. It had to look GOOD. Visitors to our home like it without noticing a single energy-saving feature. We always tell visitors that we simply “modernised” our home. The family get all the comfort they want, all the warmth, all the cosiness without consuming any fossil fuels. It is a pleasure to live in our SuperHome. That is how it should be. It is how every home should be.

Also see:
www.post-carbon-living.com/TTHW
Property background:

1980′s built property in good cosmetic condition.

Key changes made:

• Double glazed windows
• Cavity wall insulation
• Loft insulation: topped up to 300mm with sheep’s wool then over-boarded to provide access for later solar panel work
• All the upstairs imbedded ceiling lights (fitted by previous occupier) have been sealed in via the attic space to prevent drafts
• All doors to garage replaced with tightly sealing uPVC. Internal doors to Conservatory & Front door all sealed against drafts. Gaps to kitchen soil pipe sealed
• A rated condensing gas boiler fitted in Aug 2008 shortly after moving in. Simple heating controls updated at that time. Ten out of eleven radiators had TRVs fitted at the same time
• 20 x 1.8m solar thermal tubes fitted with twin coil Gledhill tank in April 2010
• 2.96kWp PV fitted in April 2010. 16 x 185Wp Mitsubishi fitted with Fronius inverter
• KWB 15kW wood pellet boiler feeding 500l buffer tank supplies all the hot water & heating needs of house prior to fitting Solar Thermal
• Whole house fitted with CFLs and ten LED units fitted to kitchen. The only remaining filament/halogens alternatives are in the fridge and oven. External security PIR lights all working with CFL’s
• A Rated Washing Machine. A Rated dishwasher (rarely used). A++ rated Fridge/Freezer
• Two water butts in garden fed by rainwater from roof. Both original lavatories replaced by Twyford Flushwise (2.6litre) water-saving units. Flow restrictors fitted to both kitchen and downstairs cloakroom taps. Similar planned for upstairs bathrooms at point of future renovation
• Wood burning stove (Dovre 250) fitted in April 2009
• Part “L” Building Regulation loft hatch door fitted with 100mm polystyrene plug
• Reflectors behind all radiators
• All water tanks and hot/cold water pipe runs insulated throughout the house including the attic
• Extra insulation to KWB Buffer tank and original DHWC

Measures installed in detail:

  • KWB 15kW wood pellet boiler feeding 500l buffer tank supplies all the hot water & heating needs of house prior to fitting Solar Thermal
  • A rated condensing gas boiler fitted in Aug 2008 shortly after moving in. Simple heating controls updated at that time. Ten out of eleven radiators had TRVs fitted at the same time
  • Cavity wall insulation
  • Double glazed windows
  • All the upstairs imbedded ceiling lights (fitted by previous occupier) have been sealed in via the attic space to prevent drafts
  • All doors to garage replaced with tightly sealing uPVC. Internal doors to Conservatory & Front door all sealed against drafts. Gaps to kitchen soil pipe sealed
  • Loft insulation: topped up to 300mm with sheep’s wool then over-boarded to provide access for later solar panel work
  • A Rated Washing Machine. A Rated dishwasher (rarely used). A++ rated Fridge/Freezer
  • Whole house fitted with CFLs and ten LED units fitted to kitchen. The only remaining filament/halogens alternatives are in the fridge and oven. External security PIR lights all working with CFL’s
  • 2.96kWp PV fitted in April 2010. 16 x 185Wp Mitsubishi fitted with Fronius inverter
  • 20 x 1.8m solar thermal tubes fitted with twin coil Gledhill tank in April 2010
  • Two water butts in garden fed by rainwater from roof. Both original lavatories replaced by Twyford Flushwise (2.6litre) water-saving units. Flow restrictors fitted to both kitchen and downstairs cloakroom taps. Similar planned for upstairs bathrooms at point of future renovation
  • Wood burning stove (Dovre 250) fitted in April 2009
  • Part “L” Building Regulation loft hatch door fitted with 100mm polystyrene plug
  •  Reflectors behind all radiators
  • All water tanks and hot/cold water pipe runs insulated throughout the house including the attic
  •  Extra insulation to KWB Buffer tank and original DHWC
Benefits of work carried out:

Our home is always warm in Winter and cool in Summer. We have Gas as a back up but never need it so pay nothing for Gas. We generate nearly 97% of all our own electricity but still pay just under £400 annually just for the nightly import. It is something we will be working on in future. Our wood fuel cost is pretty steep even in comparison to oil with the wood pellets costing about £1100 annually. To offset this we earn £1500 annually on the Feed In Tariff (for the photovoltaics) so the system pays for itself. However we have to be conscious that logs for the wood-burning stove in the lounge can cost an average of £200 annually. Then there is the sweeping of the chimney & flue plus boiler maintenance which can be anything from £100 to £500 annually. We are hoping that the Renewable Heat Incentive will cover these costs from 2013 but we have been waiting a long time. Eventually it should pay US to live here. What we don’t spend can go in the bank and be reserved for replacement of the renewable energy systems. Hopefully nothing should need replacing inside 25 years so we have plenty of time to save up.

Favourite feature:

The favourite feature is the one no one can see – the loft insulation. It sounds odd but it is the one feature that was done entirely as a DIY task when we first moved in. We needed to use the attic for storage so I bought wooden over-joisting that was laid at right-angles to the ceiling joists. These were fixed in place then sheep wool insulation laid between the new joists. Then another layer of joisting was laid at right angles again with another layer of sheeps wool. Then it was all boarded over. We did it all ourselves in the hot summer of 2008 between August and October. It was an enormous task requiring endless hours in the attic after work. It was extremely hot and dirty. Mark wore a disposible jump suit and dust mask for the period and it was extremely uncomfortable. But the effort was worh it when we started to use the storage space it gave us. We can now go up there whenever we need without anyone getting an itchy rash from spun mineral fibre insulation. It is a nice environment, well lit and spacious. You don’t get the same amount of pleasure from the things you pay people to do for you!

Project update:

From the Spring of 2013 we replaced some 30 Compact Fluorescent energy saving lightbulbs (“CFL”) with their nearest equivalent LED alternative. This included all spotlights and a couple of halogen replacements for the cooker extractor hood. The only tungsten filament bulb in the house is now in the oven. The only CFLs left are those high-lumen ones that are the equivalent of 100watt tungsten filaments. Alternatives are not yet available for these in anglepoise lamps.

Updated on 29/04/2013

Contact this homeowner

Assessment types

SuperHomes Assessed

A home that has been visited and assessed by us and confirmed as reaching the SuperHome standard, which demonstrates a 60% carbon saving.

Homeowner Reported

Information has been provided by the homeowner about their home and energy use prior to the installation of measures and following their installation which demonstrates a carbon saving. This information has not been verified.

Remote Assessed

The homeowner has provided information on their home including what measures have been installed which has enables an assessor working on our behalf to assess their carbon savings. This home has not been visited to verify the measures installed.

Unassessed

This home has not been assessed, but the homeowner has reported what measures have been installed. It may be that this home is awaiting assessment.